Tag Archives: Health Visiting

How can health visitors support families after NNU?

Hello, my name is Charlie. I’m a health visitor and practice teacher. I’m also an IVF mummy to a 32 weeker (who is now 5).

I remember my daughter’s delivery as if it was yesterday. My waters began to go whilst I was doing our local child health clinic. I was admitted to hospital and five days later I gave birth to our beautiful little girl, Emma. I was 32+1 and Emma weighed 3lbs, 4oz. Emma and I are very close, she is my little buddy. One thing which still upsets me still, is that Emma was taken from me at delivery and taken to NNU. This was absolutely the right thing for her, but as a new mother, it is very traumatising. Having your baby taken from your arms by her paediatricians was something I wouldn’t wish on anyone.

I had my placenta manually removed in theatre whilst I haemorrhaged four pints of blood. Whilst I desperately tried not to faint, I could see my husband’s face getting paler and paler. He later described the scene as a ‘blood bath’ and that he was worried he would lose me. I knew I would be ok, but from my husband’s point of view, it probably was a bit scary. I could not fault the care that I received. In some ways, it was a blessing having Emma in NNU as it gave me the time to recover and regain my strength.

Emma spent three weeks in NNU. The staff are amazing. They supported me in breast feeding her and were nothing but kind and caring. However, as a mummy, it can be a really boring place to be. Emma slept loads. So other than expressing milk and writing thank you cards, I did not have much to do. As Emma moved through the unit towards discharge, I remember craving to be normal. hv-blog

Finally we were discharged home. I had no experience as a mother, so reverted back to what I knew, my job. So Emma and I went to the child health clinic I used to run. It felt so familiar, but so different. Many of the other mums came over to speak to me. Those who I did not know made comments on how they had never seen such a small baby before. I just wanted to run away. My baby was not something out of a circus show, she was mine and she was beautiful and strong. This familiar, safe place I had been too had let me down. I felt uncomfortable and isolated.

What this has taught me as a health visitor, is that is does not matter what you do for a living, when you are a preemie mummy, you are a preemie mummy. It is ok to grieve for the loss of ‘normal’. It is ok to feel sad that the paediatrician took your baby away and it is ok to feel like you don’t belong and that your baby is different. I am also very mindful of how daddies feel, we cannot forget that they might also grieve and that they too can feel traumatised. Unfortunately we do not see fathers often, but they are a vital part of the family and cannot be forgotten.

We deliver the Healthy Child Programme to all families, but when you’ve delivered early, you might have missed out on the antenatal. We have good relationships with our NNU’s and often visit families in hospital. I know the mothers I have met have been pleased of the company if nothing else. When baby come home, your health visitor will visit you and your baby for your new birth visit. This is an opportunity to explore your feelings and you can discuss with your HV how best she/he can support you. Postnatal depression (PND) affect 1:10 women, but you are statistically more likely to suffer PND if you have had IVF or suffered a traumatic event, including delivering early. HV’s can support you through listening visits and signposting. Please do not feel afraid to speak honestly to your HV. She/he will not judge or criticise. We are just here to support you in being the best parent you can be for you baby. I have put several preemie mothers in contact in my area and they have found great support in each other. If you are keen to meet another preemie mummy, ask you HV is she knows anyone who has a similar story to you. The chances are they do.

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Preemie mummies and daddies are amazing and preterm babies are gorgeous and special. I’m a very proud mother of my preterm and it is true what they say, “Only special people deliver a preterm baby.” 

 

With special thanks to Charlie Woodley, preemie mum and health visitor, offering important words of advice.

Like what you’ve read? Would like to help us raise awareness? Then click the sharing Facebook and Twitter buttons and make The Smallest Things Matter.

Got a story you’d like to share?  email Catriona at smallestthings@yahoo.com

 

 

Small but Mighty!

Making a Difference!

Sometimes it really is the little things that can make a difference… and for the parents of premature babies we hope that our new “Preemie Proud” stickers will make a BIG difference.

Acting as a visible reminder, our Smallest Things Preemie Proud stickers are there to alert health care professionals to a babies NICU history. The support for the stickers has been amazing, with extremely positive feedback; and we offer our sincere thanks to all our Smallest Things mums who have contributed to their design.

Preemie Proud!

Used to personalise a baby’s red books, parents can choose from a series of stickers all of which are designed to meet the particular needs of NICU babies and their families.

Our “Preemie Proud” stickers are designed to –

  • Raise awareness of premature birth
  • Prompt a conversation between health professional and parent about their neonatal care journey
  • Engage health professionals in learning more about the realities of neonatal care
  • Highlight the extra support parents of premature babies may need
  • Increase awareness that parents following neonatal intensive care are at greater risk of developing postnatal depression, anxiety and PTSD
  • Offer a gentle reminder to use a babies corrected age when plotting their weight on a growth chart
  • … and to say how amazing our tiny babies are!

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Small but Mighty!

A sticker; it’s only a small and a simple idea, but it could make a dramatic difference to the lives of thousands NICU families.

Each year 80,000 babies are born requiring specialist neonatal care in the UK, with 20,000 of them spending a prolonged period in hospital…. and it is our aim that “Preemie Proud” sticker packs are available to each and every one of them.

Help make the Smallest Things matter!

It’s a big task, so we are excited to have begun our Crowdfunding drive, fundraising for the launch of the Preemie Proud sticker campaign.

If you would like to see Preemie Proud stickers available in all UK NICUs and to all parents of premature babies them please do consider donating a small sum to the campaign below.

images (1)http://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/Smallest-Things

 

It’s the Smallest Things: Our Action for NHS Change Day!

images1 in 9 babies are born prematurely (prior to 37 weeks gestation)

That’s 60,000 babies born early each year in the UK, with nearly all requiring specialist NHS neonatal care.

The Smallest Things was created to raise awareness of the realities of life in neonatal care; to cast light on an often hidden world and to campaign for more support for parents in the aftermath of their journey.

Since our launch six months ago, a constant theme has been mothers recognising their own stories in our words; but it goes further than this – for some for the first time have realised that they are not alone in their journey, that their feelings of loss, guilt and anxiety are shared by other NICU mums.

So, what is needed?

What can we change on NHS change day?

It doesn’t need to be a grand gesture or big action.

No, it’s all about the Small Things of course!

All important cuddles

All important cuddles

– A health visitor who knows to correct your babies age on their weight chart

– The GP who understands that your baby will not be meeting their ‘6 week’ check milestones… as they haven’t reached their due date yet!

– A friend who realises that just because your home, your journey is not over.

– The health visitor who really asks how you are, who listens and allows you share your story.

A doctor who understands that to a preemie or a preemie mum a cold is not just a cold.

As part of our ACTION for #NHSChangeDay we pledge to:

untitled (6)Continue to raise awareness through story telling. Sharing the experiences of parents during and after their stay in neonatal intensive care.

untitled (6)Empower mothers to share their stories with health professionals, creating a “things to know about me & my early baby” postcard.

untitled (6)Link up with health care professionals, highlighting the link between PTSD and time spent in neonatal intensive care, so that timely and appropriate support can be given.

imagesG5IGIJEMIt really is all about the Small Things, but it’s the Small Things that matter!