World Prematurity Month – November 2016

World Prematurity Month, a time for charities, health professionals, families and organisations around the world to come together to raise awareness of the 15 million babies born premature each year.

For me, a mother of two small boys born too soon, World Prematurity Month is an opportunity to reflect upon and highlight the realities of neonatal intensive care; a chance to shine a light on a hidden world and a journey that lasts long after bringing your baby home from hospital.

As expectant parents you make plans, you allow yourself to dream and imagine.. the first hold, the first baby grown, the first feed…. but for parents of premature babies all plans and dreams are shattered as the trauma of neonatal intensive care kicks in. You don’t recognise the world around you find yourself grieving for a baby take from you too soon and placed within the protective walls of an incubator – “A womb with a view” as a friend once said.

Smallest Things

On leaving neonatal care, full of conflicting emotions, you think that your NICU time is done… only there are new challenges to face.

Incubators, life support machines and monitors are behind you, but the memories and worries last. One day you feel brave enough to leave the house. You might visit a mum and baby group – and that’s when then it comes, the dreaded question…

“How old is your baby”?

I know I’m not alone in rounding down my baby’s age and even then I would see the quizzical. I would tell them that my baby was 6 months old, although developing according to his corrected age he looked and acted like a 3 month old.  Next comes the dilemma; either explain that he was born premature and risk being asked often insensitive and upsetting questions or endure the inevitable developmental comparisons. I didn’t like the feeling I was making excuses for my baby – ‘he’s six months old, but really he’s only three months’ I would hear myself saying.

With the benefit of hindsight (and a bit of preemie mum strength), I might now tell those mums that my baby hadn’t quite mastered sitting independently yet, but what he had mastered in those six months was to teach himself to breath, to learn to co-ordinate sucking and swallowing, to regulate his own heartrate and that he trebled his birth weight – pretty impressive milestones I would say!

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Unless you’ve had a baby in neonatal care, or a close relative in that position, you have no reason to know about life in NICU, so I tried to brushed remarks like ‘I could never have left my baby alone in hospital’ or ‘is he normal now?’ aside, but they hurt and I felt alone.

Not only was it the mum and baby groups I began to avoid though, community health professionals, who I thought would be there to support me, also seemed to lack awareness. I lost count of the number of times I was asked if he was smiling yet. Each time I gave the same response – ‘he hasn’t reached his due date yet’! I was forever asking that his weight be plotted according to his corrected age and the six week check was laughable. I felt like putting a big sticker on the front of his read book saying “remember I’m a premature baby!” (Which is why, years later I developed the “Preemie Proud” Red Book stickers!)

I launched The Smallest Things blog two years ago, writing about my own experiences to raise awareness of premature birth and the challenges faced by families following neonatal care. This World Prematurity Month I will continue to write, as well as sharing guest blogs, about a journey that does not end at the hospital doors.

Raising Awareness really does help to make the Smallest Things matter – even if only to help with the dreaded “how old is your baby?” question!

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Don’t forget to follow The Smallest Things on our Facebook Page for all the latest stories and news for World Prematurity Month!

 

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