The NICU Roller-Coaster

Jaxon was to be my third child. My precious two pregnancies and labours were as straight forward as can be. My midwife this time was encouraging me to have a home birth! I never felt quite right during this pregnancy, I was catching coughs and colds very easily and felt ill constantly. All Jaxons movements were very low compared to my last two pregnancies, but my midwife said it was “because your stomach muscles are not what they used to be”.

At exactly 24 weeks I had pains constantly all day – I even googled if it was too early for Brixton hicks! Then in the evening I started to bleed so my husband and I went to the hospital.

I was adamant that I was having a miscarriage and repeatedly kept apologising to my husband for losing our boy. The thought that he was trying to come early did not even enter my mind until the Dr said I needed steroid injections to boost the baby’s lungs before he arrived!

Over the next couple of days I remained in hospital; I continued to have pains that would come and go and I continued to bleed which would stop and start. On day 3 I was having much stronger pains which felt very much like strong contractions. By 8pm I literally had to beg for someone to examine me because at this point I was having strong pains every 15 minutes. At 10pm a doctor finally arrived and examined me, she couldn’t hide her shock – I was 6cm dilated. I was rushed to the delivery suite and was frantically worried, how was this happening?

A doctor from the NICU visited me and explained that my son had 40% chance of survival and that the hospital wasn’t equipped to care for 24 weekers. He said my son would be made stable and would then be sent to another hospital. As if someone flicked a switch, my contractions just stopped!

By 10am the next morning they had completely stopped and the doctors decided it would be best for the baby if I was transferred to another hospital before the birth… but the only hospital available was 60 miles away!

I didn’t care, I would go absolutely anywhere if it gave my baby a chance. Two hours after arriving in Sheffield Jaxon was born. He was taken straight to NICU. A couple of hours later we were allowed to visit him. I didn’t know what to expect but despite all the tubes and wires I could tell instantly that he looked like his big brother.

When Jaxon was only hours old we were called to speak to the doctor. Jaxon had suffered from a grade 4 and grade 3 bleed in his brain. He had not responded to treatment for over an hour and his stats were only in the sixties despite being on 100% ventilation. The doctor felt that Jaxon was not going to make it through the night and didn’t want him to die without us holding him. We were advised that the best thing for Jaxon would be to switch the machines off and spend time alone with him in the quiet room until he passed away. I will never forget the sound of my husband’s cries during this time. The most heart-breaking sound I have ever heard.

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We both wanted Jaxon christened before so we waited with Jaxon for the priest to arrive. I spent that time stroking his head, repeatedly begging him to make it saying “come on baby don’t give up”. My husband nudged me – Jaxons stats were rising!

I did not dare to hope. He was christened as planned and afterwards the medical team were amazed that he had started to respond and we were told that for now his machines would not be turned off.

The next few days involved a lot of discussions of what level of disability we would ‘accept’ as Jaxons bleeds were so severe. There was no question for me, this was my boy and if Jaxson surviving involved moulded wheelchairs and hoists I didn’t care. I just wanted my baby to survive.

He continued to improve slowly each day, but it was a long and slow journey. At 5 weeks old we were told that he had hydrocephalus as a result of the bleed and he would need a shunt inserted. The operation date was planned and involved Jaxon being transferred to a children’s hospital in Sheffield. On the day of the operation Jaxon reacted to the sedative used to transport him and the operation was cancelled as it was now too risky. Instead they removed the fluid manually and monitored his head circumference, all the time trying to delay surgery until he was stronger.

He remained ventilated till 8 weeks old and needed steroids to get him off the ventilator. It was like he was a different baby; in just 24 hours he went onto CPAP and then off CPAP and onto highflow. He was allowed the top off his incubator and was transferred into high dependency. We were told that he was now strong enough to be transferred to a hospital closer to home. I had spent the whole 8 weeks in Sheffield away from home – including Christmas.

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Jaxon was transferred to a hospital an hour from home where he remained for the next 8 weeks. His head circumference was slowly increasing yet they still felt he was not strong enough for surgery. His lungs were proving the biggest problem; we were told that we needed to get him onto low flow oxygen so he could have the surgery. His new doctor was not positive at all for Jaxon’s future. He told us that he would definitely have a severe disability; that he wouldn’t go to a mainstream school, that he wouldn’t be able to orally feed and that he had the worst case of chronic lung disease he’d ever seen.

The news hit me like a train.

Once I calmed my tears I took great pleasure in telling the doctor that Jaxon had in fact consumed 6 bottles within the last 24 hours!

At 37 weeks gestation he was finally able to be on low flow oxygen and three days before his due date he was transferred to another hospital for surgery.

We spent the next few days having tests and MRIs. His head circumference was growing very rapidly now and later that week he had a shunt inserted. Afterwards we were transferred back to his previous hospital while oxygen was arranged for going home.

At exactly 4 months old Jaxon came home!

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We were so happy to finally have him home; but he wasn’t quite right though. He was very grumpy and unsettled with his sleep and his feeds. I put it down to having his injections the day before, but 6 days later it became apparent what was truly wrong.

He developed a lump on his head where his shunt was, so I took him straight to our local A&E department. They told me they thought his shunt was either infected or broken and we were blue lighted back to the hospital where he’d had his shunt inserted.

The next few hours were more and more tests and we were told that Jaxons shunt was severely infected. He needed emergency surgery to remove the shunt and he would need two weeks of strong antibiotics via a long line before having a new shunt inserted.

I felt so angry – when was our poor boy going to be given a break from all of this!

He began having seizures and I was told it was due to the infection being so severe. It took a few days to find the right antibiotics to fight the infection but once they did Jaxon responded quickly. Two weeks later he had a new shunt and after another 4 days he was finally home again.

Over the 4 months since Jaxon has been home he has gone from strength to strength and he has been off home oxygen for the last three weeks! He is doing everything he should be doing for his corrected age and is such a happy, cheeky, little boy. His pediatrician and physiotherapist are delighted with his progress.

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There is no roller coaster like NICU, but ALWAYS believe in your baby; they are stronger than anyone could ever imagine!

Aimee Davis

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