6 Months: Making the Smallest Things Matter

6 months: Time can be a strange concept to a parent of a premature baby.

Timescales sometimes don’t seem to apply to them.

Six months, the length of my pregnancy – that still sounds wrong.

It has been six months since the launch of the Smallest Things.

– Six months of raising awareness.

– Six months of sharing stories.

– Six months where we continue to say, more support for parents of premature babies please!

Setting up our campaign has been a humbling experience; not least through the overwhelming support we have received, but by the wonderful and often amazing people I am coming into contact with. Six months in I offer a huge heartfelt thank you to everyone who has supported us so far, to each and every one of you who have helped to make The Smallest Things what it has become in such a short space of time.

The solar eclipse took place earlier today behind the clouds and for a while darkness fell. As rays of light appeared and the darkness lifted I was reminded of the similar sense of hope felt by parents in NICU. The light at the end of the tunnel, the light as you edge closer to the NICU door and the light as you hope soon the NICU experience will become a distant memory. Sadly though not all babies survive their 1st picvery early start; born too small or too poorly – but mothers like Hugo’s mum Leigh inspire us through #HugosLegacy, becoming a ray of light for others surviving baby loss and reminding us how amazing ALL premmie babies are.

Of course we know that for many, despite the hope, NICU does not become a distant memory. Indeed the sounds, feelings and emotions can stay with parents of premature babies for years to come. Sarra Hoy describes beautifully her own journey in neonatal care and her membership into the ‘premmie mum club’; a life long membership for her, yet a determination that her son will not be defined by his early start.

smallest thingsFinding yourself to be part of ‘the premmie club’ has been a welcome discovery for some, with mothers visiting our site and for the first time recognising their own story in our words – “it’s so reassuring to know that a lot of the thoughts & feelings I had whilst baby was in special are common amongst prem baby mums!”.

There have been lots of positives to our campaign so far, like the politician who supports our campaign to extend maternity leave for mothers of very premature babies “In such a crucial time for families, it makes sense to support extended maternity leave for parents of very premature babies” or the hospital chief executive who has agreed to review their car parking charges and policies for parents of babies in NICU … but it is the smallest things that matter and if just one mother has found that her feelings of loss and grief are common and indeed a ‘normal’ part of the NICU process, or if just one mother recognises the symptoms and feelings of PTSD or anxiety and seeks help, then 6 months as the Smallest Things has made the small things matter.

Time can be a strange concept to a parent of a premature baby.

Launching on the 20th September, picked as a special date, the date on which we brought our first son home from hospital. Six months later, how old would he be?

– Eight months, his chronological age?

– Five Months, his corrected age?

How old is your baby – the question every prem parent dreads!

Parents of premature babies may also recognise our sigh of relief that we’ve made it through the winter – through the beautifulcough and cold season! With spring on our doorstep we now look forward to the next six months in anticipation.

– Six months of raising awareness.

– Six months of sharing stories.

– Six months where we continue to say, more support for parents of premature babies please!

 

One thought on “6 Months: Making the Smallest Things Matter

  1. keepsmeoutofmischief

    Well done for all your hard work.

    I’ve just spent the day at the NEC with my premmie in a sling. I lost count of the number of times I had the same conversation:
    Them: awww, how old is he?
    Me: 12 weeks.
    Them: he’s very small.
    Me: he should only be 4 weeks old.
    Them: Oh.

    That ‘oh’ is so final. It’s lovely that people take an interest, but I read way too much into that ‘oh’. I want to say to them -he’s doing really well, he’s putting on weight like there’s no tomorrow and in a couple of years time you won’t know the difference, just like his brother. ‘Oh’ should be banned. People need to realise that being premature is not done kind of life sentence. Grrrr.

    Like

    Reply

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